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Old book review

Here’s an interesting book pointed out to me from a reader, thank’s Peter! It’s called The Theory and Practice of Malting and Brewing. By a Practical Brewer by William Creech  You can read it here. The great thing about it is that it was published in 1793, a time that predates the use of Black Patent malt in 1817 (which would eventually replace diastatic brown malt) and it’s also a time where thermometers were used to record temperatures in Farenheit. The Farenheit scale was first introduced in 1724 so it is between these two dates that we can find books published about brewing that include temperatures used in the process of making malt and beer in a more pre-industrial era and by that I mean this predates the mechanization and increased scale of malting.  So we get some very useful descriptions of malting and brewing practices that serve as a window into the past. What’s amazing about this book is all of the unique descriptions about brewing practices, things like adding the hops before the boil pg. 37 for a perceptible improvement in flavour. Hmmm gotta try that. Here’s a link to an article on first wort hopping.

There is also mention of using fresh hops for small beer on page 66. But more importantly, this is the first time I’ve seen mention of different colours of brown malt. They are referred to as Brown, Middling Brown, and High Brown. What?! This suggests that malt colour and therefore beer was not as inconsistent as one (being me) might have assumed. And if you’re into brewing historical beers check out the recipes included on page 60-72.

 

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Posted by on October 14, 2018 in Brown malt

 

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Un-aerated steeping Part 1

Ok, mind blown, and I don’t know how I’ve missed this key piece of information. Sometimes I feel like the world of malting is shrouded in so much mystery that you have to be a detective to figure it out. The data in the Scotch Bigg Report provided the biggest piece of the puzzle that was missing for me: that long germination times are only possible with un-aerated steeps. The report gives us actual recorded steep times, which are shockingly long 40-118 hours. What may be even more important was the observation in the report that some maltsters only changed their steep water once or twice and some not at all. But how is this possible? Most texts I’ve read state that the grain will die if submerged for over 24 hours, I’ve told people this myself (my apologies). In fact, I believe it’s only been in the last 150 years that aeration has been used in the steeping process – but I’ll have to do some further investigating to confirm this. In part one of this project, I do a side by side comparison of malt steeped with air rests and malt steeped for 72 hours without. Results in a nutshell: the un-aerated tastes better, but I haven’t brewed with them yet, that’s part two. One factor that may skew the comparison is that I malted these barley samples at the same temperature, which was lower than I would normally malt aerated barley – this may have affected the flavour of the aerated malt. This will be addressed in part three – how does historically malted barley compare with modern malt (malted at warmer temperatures – 15C, 59F)

 
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Posted by on February 12, 2017 in History, un-aerated malt

 

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